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After a Traumatic Brain Injury

Head Trauma (Traumatic Brain Injury) - VHL HealthSheet #85289_VA
Head trauma can be fatal. The effects from some types of head trauma may not appear right away. So it’s important to get immediate medical attention for any head injury.
Physical Problems After Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #83332_VA
Injury to the brain can affect other parts of the body. As a result, people who have a brain injury may have little or no control over their bodies. Muscles may weaken, tighten, or twitch. People may develop sensory problems, problems speaking, trouble with hand-eye coordination, and other problems. Some people may also have physical injuries that occurred along with the brain injury.
Behavior Changes After Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #83330_VA
After a brain injury, a person may behave in new or different ways and may have personality changes.
Problems with Thinking Skills After Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #83326_VA
One of the brain’s main roles is to allow a person to think, remember, reason, and judge. After a brain injury, a person may be less able to coordinate sequential activities (apraxia), process thought (agnosia), or use language (aphasia).
Problems with the Senses After Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #83328_VA
Sometimes an injury damages the part of the brain that controls balance, sight, or hearing. Or memory loss may keep a person from remembering certain sights, sounds, smells, or tastes. Some people have trouble handling abstract ideas, such as time, or they may simply forget what they are doing from one moment to the next.
Taking Care of the Family After Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #83334_VA
Any brain injury can cause some changes to the affected person and his or her family. Talk and plan with the rest of your family. Your roles may change, but don’t give up all the things you hold dear. Get help. Remember that there is often some improvement over time. Find ways to keep your family moving ahead.
Improving Sleep After Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41355_VA
Because everybody’s brain is different, your symptoms may be different from those of other people. Symptoms can include changes in the way you feel, act, think, and move. Having trouble sleeping is one symptom that affects many people with TBI.
Managing Post-Traumatic Headaches After Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41359_VA
traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a sudden jolt to your head that changes the way your brain works. It’s not surprising that headache would be the most common physical symptom after a brain injury. Because a jolt to your head also causes a jolt to your neck, headaches with neck pain are the most common types of pain after a TBI. The type of headache you get does not depend on the severity of your TBI is.
Improving Cognition After Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41361_VA
After TBI, you may have trouble remembering things, getting organized, or finding the right words to use when speaking. These types of brain functions are called cognition.
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41363_VA
A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a jolt or blow to your head that changes the way your brain works. It can cause changes in the way you think, act, and feel. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops after a scary experience in your life that also changes the way you think, act, and feel. PTSD can occur after events like accidents and assaults. Being diagnosed with a TBI increases the chance that you will also have PTSD.
Substance Abuse and Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41365_VA
A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a shock or blow to your head that changes the way your brain works. A TBI can change the way you think, feel, and act. Substance abuse is using a substance, like alcohol or a drug, in an uncontrolled way that hurts you or those around you. Many people with a TBI also have problems with substance abuse.
Caring for a Loved One With a Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41367_VA
A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury to the brain caused by a blow or shock that changes the way the brain works. The common causes of a TBI are falls, fights, auto accidents, and sports injuries. If you have a loved one with a TBI, it is important to learn as much as you can about the condition so you can take an active role in caregiving.
Living Well After a Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41369_VA
A TBI can change your life. Symptoms may include slowed thinking, headaches, clumsiness, memory loss, and mood swings. Learning how to deal with these symptoms can be hard and even make you feel depressed and angry. But the good news is that most TBI symptoms do and will improve with time. And even though some symptoms may last for years or even a lifetime, you can find ways to cope.
Depression and Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41371_VA
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury to your brain that can change the way you think, act, and feel. It is easy to understand how a brain injury can change your thinking. It may be harder to understand how it changes your feelings. In fact, dealing with changes in feelings and emotions may be the hardest part of a TBI. One of the changes that can happen after a TBI is depression.
Anxiety and Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41373_VA
A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a brain injury that can change the way you think, act, and feel. A TBI could be caused by a blow to your head, falls, fights, sports, and car accidents. Anxiety is fear and worry. Dealing with a TBI is stressful, so it’s not surprising that anxiety is a common symptom of a TBI. But when fear and worry become so strong that they get in the way of your ability to live your life, you could have an anxiety disorder.
Adjustment Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41375_VA
Having a TBI and getting better after a TBI are life-changing and stressful events. Some people develop a group of symptoms called adjustment disorder after a trauma such as a TBI.
Preventing Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41377_VA
Many TBIs occur during car accidents. Falls, firearms, explosions, and assaults are other major causes. Falls are a leading cause of TBIs for adults ages 45 and older and children. Car accidents and assaults are leading causes for teens and young adults. The first tip is to recognize the dangers of a TBI and avoid risky behavior.
Your Recovery Team for Traumatic Brain Injury - VHL HealthSheet #41379_VA
Because everybody’s brain is different, it is hard to predict how your brain will recover from a TBI. It takes a team of healthcare providers to help you develop the best plan for your recovery. Teamwork is important. And one of the most important members of your recovery team is you. You need to be an active member of your recovery team and work closely with all the other team members.
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