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Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: Your Experience

Talk to your healthcare provider about how to get ready for your surgery. Your healthcare providers will talk with you about what to expect as surgery draws near. Keep in mind that your experience may differ from that of other women you know.

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Before the Day of Surgery

Your instructions may include the following:

  • Avoid certain medications (including aspirin) for 14 days before surgery.

  • If you smoke, stop as long as possible before surgery.

  • Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before surgery. This includes chewing gum and mints.

  • Arrange ahead of time for a ride home from the hospital or surgery center.

  • If it is prescribed, take medication to clean out your bowels the day before surgery. Your healthcare provider can give you more details about this.

On the Day of Surgery

You’ll change into a gown. You’ll then be prepared for your procedure:

  • Your surgeon will see you and “mark” your skin or a wristband with the name of your surgery and the date. He or she will answer any questions you may have before you are taken to the operating room.

  • The anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist will discuss anesthesia with you and answer any questions you have.

  • Some pubic hair may be trimmed or removed.

  • An IV (intravenous) line will be put into your arm or hand. This line supplies you with medications and fluids before, during, and after surgery.

  • You may be given medication that helps you relax. You will then be given general anesthesia to make you sleep and keep you free from pain during surgery.

Risks and Complications of Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

The risks of the surgery will be discussed with you before the day of the procedure, in your physician's office. Once you understand these risks, you will be asked to sign a consent form. Risks and possible complications include:

  • Side effects from anesthesia

  • Infection

  • Bleeding, with a possible need for a transfusion

  • Blood clots

  • Damage to the bladder, bowel, ureters, or nearby nerves

  • Need for a second surgery

  • Need to change from laparoscopic hysterectomy to abdominal (open) hysterectomy while you are asleep

Author: StayWell Custom Communications
Last Annual Review Date: 5/15/2011
Copyright © The StayWell Company, LLC. except where otherwise noted.
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